About Good Tickle Brain

Created in 2013, Good Tickle Brain is the world's foremost (and very possibly only) stick figure Shakespeare webcomic.

Good Tickle Brain updates on Tuesdays and Thursdays. You can also subscribe to a weekly e-mail digest newsletter

About Me

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Hi there! My name is Mya Gosling, and I'm the creator of Good Tickle Brain. In a recent past life I was a library cataloger, but am now working full-time drawing stick figure Shakespeare comics, which is pretty cool when you stop to think about it.

My father introduced me to Shakespeare when I was eight or nine years old, and I've been addicted ever since. Initially it was just the classics, Henry V  and Hamlet  and Twelfth Night and so forth, but then I got really into the history cycles and now I'm hitting the hard stuff, like Cymbeline.

In addition to Shakespeare, I also love geeking out about operetta, musical theatre, soccer, board games, languages, fantasy and historical fiction, and a number of other things.

As you can probably tell, I'm really not much of an artist. However, a lack of talent has never stopped anyone on the internet before. 

Support Good Tickle Brain on Patreon

If you'd like to support my efforts to continue working full-time on Good Tickle Brain, please considering becoming a patron of mine on Patreon. For a small monthly subscription, you'll get access to cool bonus content like early comics, an exclusive patrons-only comic every week, video drawing tutorials, and my undying gratitude. 

Check out this short video to (a) see what I look like and (b) find out more about Patreon!

 


Contact Me

I'd love to hear from you! Stop by my Facebook page, follow me on Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram, or use the contact form below. 

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Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What does "Good Tickle Brain" mean?

A: It's a quote from Shakespeare's Henry IV, part 1. In Act 2, Scene 4, Falstaff is play-acting as King Henry IV, only his grandiose delivery keeps getting punctuated by interjections from Mistress Quickly, so he turns to her and says "Peace good pint-pot, peace good tickle-braine." I've always thought it was a fantastically charming insult, and have thus appropriate for my own nefarious purposes. Shakespeare won't mind.

Q: Where is the RSS feed for this thing?

Here it is!

Q: May I used my comics for ______?

I love being asked this! If you're interested in using my comics, please contact me via the form above. I generally say "yes" to everything, but I really appreciate being asked. I also encourage you to check out this Dork Tower comic for advice on how to best share webcomics. 

Q: I love your stuff and want a poster/book/t-shirt/mug! Where can I get one?

Take a look at the Good Tickle Brain Shoppe! This is where I sell all the merchandise that I design and produce. If there's something you're interested in that I don't currently sell, send me a message via the contact form above, but do keep in mind that making new products available does take a lot of time and money on my part, and depends a lot on demand, so please don't be impatient! 

Q: In your Hamlet 3-Panel Play, you say "Hamlet revenges his father." It should be "avenges." Revenge isn't a verb.

Prominent Shakespearean linguist disagrees with you! I direct you to my source material: "If thou didst ever thy dear father love... Revenge his foul and most unnatural murder." This is, funnily enough, one of my most often received comments. I'm all in favor of people pointing out typos (and my work is riddled with them, embarrassingly enough) but please cease the smug revenge/avenge recriminations, thank you. 

Q: Have you ever been in a Shakespeare play? If you could play any role, what would it be?

I have not ever actually acted in Shakespeare. I think I figured out pretty early on that my destiny was to be an extremely enthusiastic and discerning member of the audience, and that I should leave the acting business to the professionals,

However, if I could play any role in the entirety of the Shakespearean canon, it would be easily be Margaret of Anjou. First of all, she's in four plays - all three parts of Henry VI, plus a recurring cameo in Richard III. Take that, Mr. "I'm only in one play" Hamlet. But more importantly, Margaret of Anjou kicks ass. As soon as she marries Henry VI, she effectively becomes the ruler of England. She 100% wears the trousers in that marriage. Being queen doesn't stop her from fooling around with the Duke of Suffolk, and after he's killed, she has a great scene where she walks around, uttering lamentations, while carrying his decapitated head in her arms. That's stage gold, right there. She is active in leading the Lancastrian military efforts and often gets to run around wearing armor.

Then there's the famous "molehill" scene with the Duke of York, where she forces him to wear a paper crown and taunts him with a handkerchief stained with the blood of his son Rutland. She's cold. And then she stabs him to death. That wimpy Lady Macbeth had a nervous breakdown just from getting blood on her hands. Margaret would eat her for breakfast. And, OK, so Margaret does get her comeuppance when her only son is killed by the York boys, but then she gets a great grieving speech. "Butchers and villains! Bloody cannibals!" It's electric.

AND THEN, just when you think she's all washed up, she comes back in Richard III, curses everyone, and then sits back and gloats while all her curses come true. So really, Margaret wins the Wars of the Roses. And that's why I think she'd be fantastic fun to play.