The Tragedy of Young Siward

I've always had a soft spot for Young Siward from Macbeth. He's got four lines and a swordfight, during which he promptly dies, so one cannot rightly say he is one of Shakespeare's great roles. However, he gets a badass fight scene (usually) and basically kickstarts the entire final bloodbath, so I'm always excited to see him appear. 

And so when actor Rodrigo Beilfuss, playing Young Siward in the Stratford Festival's upcoming production of Macbeth, posted this photo of the cover of his script, complete with an alternate subtitle, I felt compelled to do Young Siward justice by making him the star of his very own mini-comic.

As with all my mini-comics, you can print out and assemble your own paper copy by downloading this pdf and following these incomprehensible instructions. Be sure to check out my other mini-comics as well. 

Very Tiny Classic: The Iliad

Time for the second installment of my Very Tiny Classics series! Today we'll be taking a look not at Shakespeare, but at one of his classical influences: Homer's Iliad

It's all the fun of the Iliad, but it also doesn't last as long as a yellow traffic light and fits in your pocket! Let's take a look. 

If you want to print out and fold your very own Tiny Classics edition of the Iliad, download this pdf, print it out at full scale, and then follow these incomprehensible instructions to fold it into an adorable little mini-comic. To see more of my mini-comics, go here.

To learn more about the extremely fun art of mini-comics, check out these resources. Mini-comics are super-fun to make and distribute.

Shakespearen What-Ifs: Macbeth

If you've explored all the nooks and crannies of my website, you might have stumbled across my Shakespeare What-Ifs series of mini-comics. For a long time there have only been two installments, but I've finally gotten my act together and penned a third one. Let's take a look at Macbeth

See, Macbeth? If you'd just waited patiently everything would have turned out OK!

If you want to print out and fold your very own edition of Shakespearean What-Ifs: Macbeth, download this pdf, print it out at full scale, and then follow these incomprehensible instructions to fold it into an adorable little mini-comic. To see all of my mini-comics, go here.

The Good Tickle Brain Guide to Stick Figures

Given that the Netherlands vs. Argentina semi-final hasn't been played yet, I thought I'd take a break from the Shakespeare World Cup and share this mini-comic that reveals the secret foundations of my iconic artistic style! Or possibly it's just a tiny guide to drawing stick figures. Take your pick.

Use this knowledge for good, readers, not evil.

If you want to print out and fold your very own guide drawing to Good Tickle Brain-style stick figures, download this pdf, print it out full scale, and follow these incomprehensible instructions to fold it into an adorable little mini-comic. To see more of my mini-comics, go here.  

Very Tiny Classics: Beowulf

Saturday was Mini-Comics Day at my local university library. I really enjoy making mini-comics, especially as the limited nature of my artistic talent works very well with the limited nature of the format. At last year's Mini-Comics Day I debuted the first of my very-slowly-ongoing Shakespearean What-Ifs series. I was tempted to continue my work on that series at this year's event, but decided to take a break from Shakespeare and tackle another great Anglo-Saxon classic.

Yes, it's Beowulf time! Before we proceed, I must admit several things:

  1. I never had to read Beowulf in school. (What's up with that, Mrs. Graff?)
  2. I have never seen any of the films based on Beowulf.
  3. I have never read any of the novels or comics based on Beowulf.
  4. I first read Beowulf about two weeks ago, when, on a whim, I picked up Seamus Heaney's translation of it in a local bookshop.
  5. My only previous exposure to Beowulf consists of a couple episodes of Xena: Warrior Princess, in which Xena helps Beowulf kill Grendel because Beowulf can't handle it on his own. 

So, you must realize that I am in no way well-versed (unintentional pun alert!) in all things Beowulf. Having said that, I think I managed to capture the essence of the epic in the following pages:

20130324-S-Beowulf.jpg

If you want to print out and fold your very own Tiny Classics edition of Beowulf, download this pdf, print it out at full scale, and then follow these incomprehensible instructions to fold it into an adorable little mini-comic. To see more of my mini-comics, go here.

To learn more about the extremely fun art of mini-comics, check out these resources. Mini-comics are super-fun to make and distribute. Don't let your perceived lack of artistic talent stop you from giving them a try. If I did that, I would never have started this website in the first place. Stick-figure mini-comics for everyone!